Joseph Edwin VIAL , 18941915 (aged 21 years)

Name
Joseph Edwin /VIAL/
Given names
Joseph Edwin
Surname
VIAL
Occupation

Newcastle Morning Herald 17th November 1980

Joe began playing the violin at 8 years of age and by the time he was 12 was beating all comers, including experienced teachers, at eisteddfods. He was an enormously popular performer in Newcastle in the pre- World War 1 days. He left for Leipzig in Germany in 1912 aged 18 to continue his studies and quickly achieved fame throughout Europe. When the war broke out he was charged with being a spy and put in a German prison which he shared with a convict who was suffering from tuberculosis in an advanced stage. After nine months spent in the dank, dark cellar Joe contracted tuberculosis and the Germans were persuaded to include him in an exchange of prisoners with the British. He lived for only 6 weeks after leaving prison, dying in London age 21.

Story taken from Newcastle Morning Herald printed on 17th November 1980.

Recital

MR. JOSEPH VIAL'S CONCERT

Mr. Joseph Vial, a young violinist from Newcastle, who, from boyhood, has made occasional appearances in Sydney at long interval gave a concert at the Y.M.C.A Hall last night before leaving to continue his studies in Europe. He played Cyril Menk's "Fantasie Irlandaise" with Raff's "Cavafing" as encore, the andante and finale from the Mendelssohn "Concerto," with Schumans "Traumerer" as encore, and several other pieces, and in every instance was applauded with enthusiasm. In point of fact these demonstrations, which so often mean very little were amply justified. Mr. Vial is a student of brilliant promise, and as he possesses already a smooth technique, almost unfailing accuracy in the most intrícate chord passages, and a very genuine sympathy with the subject matter in hand, he should mature into a really good artist. Two movements from a beautiful 'Trio for Violin, Cello and Piano" by Mendelssohn, were rendered with charm and animation by Messrs. Vial, Carl Gotsch and Mrs Constance Bailey and another con?????? number which markedly contributed to the enjoyment of the evening was a highly original and captivating "Barcarelle," a four part song by Brahms, which was rendered by an octet of girls from the Garcia School of Music, and was warmly encored. Songs by Miss Lenore Gotsch, Miss Eileen Linane (a clear-voiced mezzo), and Mr Nelson Illingworth, as well as cello solos by Carl Gotsch, were included. The accompanists were Misses Kittv O'Hara, Constance Bailey, Elsie Roberts, Mr. Alfred Hill and Mr. Cyril Menk.

Death

OBITUARY

Newcastle Morning Herald October 1915

Newspaper Obituary from Newcastle Morning Herald.

Death of Mr Joseph Vial - Promising Career Closed.

Mr Joseph Vial, the talented young violinist, of Newcastle, has succumbed to his illness in Ramsgate, England. A cable message was received yesterday by his father, Mr Edwin Vial, from Mrs Vial, conveying the sad news that their sone died on Monday. He was 21 years of age on August 21st last. The news will be received with general regret throughout the Newcastle and Maitland districts, for Joe, as the gifted young violinist was familiarly known, was popular in musical and other circles, his bright, happy disposition making him a general favourite. He made an early appearance in public winning several important prizes at Eisteddfods when quite young. His first big prize he won when only eight year of age. At the age of 12 he passed with honours in the advanced grade of the Associated Board of the Royal Academy of Music, and was awarded the College Medal for the State, and at the age of 14 he passed the difficult examination of Licentiato of the Associate Board of R.A.M and R.C.M. London. On this occasion he was warmly congratulated by Mr Percy Mills, violinist of the R.A.M England, and had the unique distinction of being awarded the Scholarship of the Royal College, which was open to the whole of Australasia. His brilliant playing has charmed thousands of hearers, and won golden opinions from may good judges. He had undoubtedly a great career ahead of his. He left Newcastle on August 7th, 1912, to pursue his studies further in Leipzig Conservatorium of Music. He was under the tuition of Professor Hans Sitt for two years, and afterwards studied under Professor Horter. He was studying with the latter teacher when the war broke out. The story of his illness and the inhuman treatment to which he was subjected by the Germans has already been told in the "Newcastle Monring Herald". Mr Vial has the consolation of knowing that Mrs Vial was with their son when he died.

Note

Newcastle Morning Herald 17th November 1980

Joe began playing the violin at 8 years of age and by the time he was 12 was beating all comers, including experienced teachers, at eisteddfods. He was an enormously popular performer in Newcastle in the pre- World War 1 days. He left for Leipzig in Germany in 1912 aged 18 to continue his studies and quickly achieved fame throughout Europe. When the war broke out he was charged with being a spy and put in a German prison which he shared with a convict who was suffering from tuberculosis in an advanced stage. After nine months spent in the dank, dark cellar Joe contracted tuberculosis and the Germans were persuaded to include him in an exchange of prisoners with the British. He lived for only 6 weeks after leaving prison, dying in London age 21.

Story taken from Newcastle Morning Herald printed on 17th November 1980.