Mid North Coast Pioneers - Newcastle to Lismore and beyond

Louis Reginald NORTHEY

Name
Louis Reginald NORTHEY
Given names
Louis Reginald
Surname
NORTHEY
Birthyes

MarriageLydia Elizabeth “Bessie” DOYLEView this family
about 1894
Address: Registrar's Office
Citation details: 1894/999 Lydia Elizabeth d'Oyle Louis Reginald Northey
DivorceLydia Elizabeth “Bessie” DOYLEView this family
before 1899
Publication: Daily newspaper centred in Sydney
Citation details: Saturday 16 March 1935, page 16
Text:

BESSIE DOYLE.

Former Famous Violinist.

APPLICATION TO COURT. MAINTENANCE FROM DECEASED

HUSBAND'S ESTATE.

Old concert-goers of Sydney will recall the name of Bessie Doyle, one of the great-est violinists of Australia. She toured Europe, America, and Africa, and established herself as one of the most popular artists of the day. It was revealed in the Equity Court yesterday, that she is now at the age of 61 years, in destitute circumstances.

As Lydia Elizabeth Northey she applied to the Chief Judge, Mr. Justice Long Innes, for an order under the Testator's Family Maintenance Act in respect of the estate of Louis Reginald Northey, late of Macleay-street, Potts Point. The testator, who died in August, 1933, left an estate of £23,000. By his will, he gave £1000 to a sister living in England and the remainder of his estate to the Royal National Lifeboat Institution ofGreat Britain.

The applicant when she was famous as a player of the violin, it was stated, was first known as Bessie Doyle, and later as Eilleen O'Moore.

By her affidavit she stated that she married Northey at the office of the Registrar at Auckland, New Zealand, in April, 1894, she being a spinster and he a divorcee. The marriage was kept secret, but he accompanied her on a concert tour of the dominion acting as assistant manager. He deserted her and informed her a little later that he wanted a divorce. Shortly afterwards she left for Europe, where she gave concerts until 1897, receiving in the meantime letters from her husband urging her to divorce him. While returning to Australia in 1897 she saw him at Auckland, where she was advised by his solicitors that a divorce could be obtained in America which would be valid everywhere. Acting on her husband's suggestion she went to Fargo (North Dakota) and the Court there, on her petition, at the hearing of which her husband was represented, granted a decree of divorce. She then went on a concert tour of Germany, Austria, and Russia, and was in England in 1899, when believing herself to be legally divorced, she married one Robert Mitchell on October 12 of that year. In 1900, while in South Africa, she saw a letter which Northey had written to Sir George Bullogh, stating that her marriage with Mitchell was bigamous. While living in Paris during the following year Northey wrote to her saying that he had consulted counsel, and was bringing proof that the American divorce was not valid, and that she was still his wife. Subsequently he called on her at Paris, showed her the legal opinions he had obtained, and convinced her that she was still his legal wife. He extracted a promise that she would not again live with Mitchell, and this promise she had kept. Since then she had always regarded Northey as her husband. He had never supported her, as until two years ago she maintained herself by con-cert work and teaching. She was now 61, and practically destitute.

Letters which had been sent to the appli-cant by Northey many years ago were read, and letters more recently addressed by her to him were tendered by respondents.

The hearing was interrupted by the adjournment.

Death of a wifeLydia Elizabeth “Bessie” DOYLE
before August 14, 1937
Publication: Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Saturday 14 August 1937, page 12
Deathyes

Family with Lydia Elizabeth “Bessie” DOYLE - View this family
himself
ex-wife
Marriage: about 1894Auckland, , , New Zealand
Divorce: before 1899Fargo, North Dakota, United States of America
Robert MITCHELL + Lydia Elizabeth “Bessie” DOYLE - View this family
wife’s husband
ex-wife
Marriage: October 12, 1899England, United Kingdom

MarriageNew Zealand Register of Births, Deaths and Marriages
Citation details: 1894/999 Lydia Elizabeth d'Oyle Louis Reginald Northey
DivorceNewspaper - Sydney Morning Herald
Publication: Daily newspaper centred in Sydney
Citation details: Saturday 16 March 1935, page 16
Text:

BESSIE DOYLE.

Former Famous Violinist.

APPLICATION TO COURT. MAINTENANCE FROM DECEASED

HUSBAND'S ESTATE.

Old concert-goers of Sydney will recall the name of Bessie Doyle, one of the great-est violinists of Australia. She toured Europe, America, and Africa, and established herself as one of the most popular artists of the day. It was revealed in the Equity Court yesterday, that she is now at the age of 61 years, in destitute circumstances.

As Lydia Elizabeth Northey she applied to the Chief Judge, Mr. Justice Long Innes, for an order under the Testator's Family Maintenance Act in respect of the estate of Louis Reginald Northey, late of Macleay-street, Potts Point. The testator, who died in August, 1933, left an estate of £23,000. By his will, he gave £1000 to a sister living in England and the remainder of his estate to the Royal National Lifeboat Institution ofGreat Britain.

The applicant when she was famous as a player of the violin, it was stated, was first known as Bessie Doyle, and later as Eilleen O'Moore.

By her affidavit she stated that she married Northey at the office of the Registrar at Auckland, New Zealand, in April, 1894, she being a spinster and he a divorcee. The marriage was kept secret, but he accompanied her on a concert tour of the dominion acting as assistant manager. He deserted her and informed her a little later that he wanted a divorce. Shortly afterwards she left for Europe, where she gave concerts until 1897, receiving in the meantime letters from her husband urging her to divorce him. While returning to Australia in 1897 she saw him at Auckland, where she was advised by his solicitors that a divorce could be obtained in America which would be valid everywhere. Acting on her husband's suggestion she went to Fargo (North Dakota) and the Court there, on her petition, at the hearing of which her husband was represented, granted a decree of divorce. She then went on a concert tour of Germany, Austria, and Russia, and was in England in 1899, when believing herself to be legally divorced, she married one Robert Mitchell on October 12 of that year. In 1900, while in South Africa, she saw a letter which Northey had written to Sir George Bullogh, stating that her marriage with Mitchell was bigamous. While living in Paris during the following year Northey wrote to her saying that he had consulted counsel, and was bringing proof that the American divorce was not valid, and that she was still his wife. Subsequently he called on her at Paris, showed her the legal opinions he had obtained, and convinced her that she was still his legal wife. He extracted a promise that she would not again live with Mitchell, and this promise she had kept. Since then she had always regarded Northey as her husband. He had never supported her, as until two years ago she maintained herself by con-cert work and teaching. She was now 61, and practically destitute.

Letters which had been sent to the appli-cant by Northey many years ago were read, and letters more recently addressed by her to him were tendered by respondents.

The hearing was interrupted by the adjournment.