Mid North Coast Pioneers - Newcastle to Lismore and beyond

Pioneer

John HOWEAge: 7817741852

Name
John HOWE
Given names
John
Surname
HOWE
Birth 1774
Birth of a daughter
#1
Mary Ann HOWE
October 27, 1798 (Age 24)
MarriageFrances WARDView this family
before 1802 (Age 28)
Immigration June 13, 1802 (Age 28)
Publication: Lesley Uebel, 2001, CD
Citation details: The Transports Page 4
Publication: Web Site
Note: John, Frances and their daughter Mary arrived on board the "Coromandel I" (1) as free settlers.
Death of a wifeFrances WARD
September 1802 (Age 28)
Citation details: HOW FRANCES 614/1802 V1802614 148
Land Grant
100 acres
about 1802 (Age 28)
Address: Mulgrave Place
Publication: Web Site
Howe - John - Land Grant
Howe - John - Land Grant

Note: Downloaded from the Australian Dictionary of Biography.

MarriageJane KENNEDYView this family
May 13, 1811 (Age 37)
Address: St. John's
Religion: Church of England
Publication: Web Site
Publication: New South Wales, Australia, St. John's Parramatta, Marriages, 1790-1966
Howe - Kennedy - John and Jane - Marriage Certificate
Howe - Kennedy - John and Jane - Marriage Certificate

Note: Downloaded from ancestry.com.au

Birth of a son
#2
John Kennedy HOWE
April 5, 1812 (Age 38)
Publication: Part: Windsor and Richmond Gazette (NSW : 1888 - 1954), Friday 11 November 1921, page 11
Text:

Windsor and Richmond Gazette (NSW : 1888 - 1954), Friday 11 November 1921, page 11

Interesting Memoirs.

EBENEZER, PORTLAND, AND WINDSOR PIONEERS.

By GEORGE G. REEVE.

(For the 'Windsor and Richmond Gazette.')

Herewith is a picture of John Kennedy Howe, who was born at Windsor, N.S.W., on April 5th, 1812, and was the first-born of a large family to John Howe and Jane Kennedy, the latter being the second wife of the famous storekeeper, auctioneer and explorer; also ferry-builder over the Haw-kesbury River at Windsor, and founder of Howe's Bridge over South Creek at Windsor.

John Howe I. first had a 100-acre grant on the left bank of the Hawkesbury, near Portland Head, which he farmed and where he resided with his wife, Frances Howe, from 1802 until 1810. The first Mrs. Howe is buried on that grant. She bore to John Howe I. two daughters, one named Mary and the other named Eliza.

The daughter Mary became in due time a famous Windsor hostess on the old site of the 'Green Dragon' of 1821, the 'Red Lion' of 1835-37 and upwards.

In the year 1810, when Andrew Thompson died and was the first body laid to rest in venerated old St. Matthew's churchyard, Windsor, John Howe I. sold his grant, and, being an executor for Thompson's estate, purchased the business of the latter, which Howe conducted for more than 20 years. John Howe later had a farm of 200 acres at Morpeth, where he died in the year 1852. John Kennedy Howe died at 'Redbourne-bury,' Singleton, on September 4, 1890, aged 78 years. He never married.

Mary Howe, the pioneer's eldest daughter (who came with her parents on the 'Coro-mandel'), was first married to George Loder II., who had accompanied Howe on both his famous overland trips to the Hun-ter River in the years 1819 and 1820 res-pectively. Mrs. Mary Loder bore seven children to Mr. G. Loder II., the latter dying on August 13, 1834, just after build-ing the large house in George-street, Wind-sor (at present owned by Mr. D. Holland, one time Mayor of Windsor), with the Georgeian verandah and the remarkably wide hall that it contains. The front keystone of that house shows the date of the erection of the building (1834). It can he seen from the front by anyone interested.

Mrs. Mary Loder married, secondly, Thomas Dargin, son of the original Dargin who was a man-o'-warsman of the Second Fleet. The couple then conducted a business with remarkable success at the old 'Green Dragon' Inn site, until Mr. Dargin's death, when Mrs. Mary Dargin married a third husband, Laban White, an auctioneer, and later Returning Officer for the Parliamentary elections. Mrs. Mary White died at the goodly age of 84 years. In the 'S.M. Herald' of September 22nd, 1882, is the notice of her death as follows:—

WHITE.— September 17 (1882), at her sister's residence (Mrs. George Dight, nee Elizabeth Moore Howe), 'Stafford,' near Singleton (Mrs.), Mary White, in her 84th year. The deceased lady was the eldest daughter of the late Mr. John Howe, of Morpeth, and arrived in New South Wales with her father in 1802.

John Howe's second daughter by his first wife, Frances, also married a Dargin. I am of that opinion because in the Kennedy vault in St. Matthew's Church of England cemetery, Windsor, one record states:—

Sacred to the memory of Eliza Charlotte Dargin, who departed this life 13th of June, 1834, aged 33 years.

(What was this Dargin's christian name? I would like verification of my surmise from any member of the Dargin family in the Hawkesbury district, or elsewhere, who can fault the accuracy or otherwise of my statement on this matter.)

John Howe I. by his second wife, Jane Kennedy, had four sons and five daughters. The sons were respectively named (1) John Kennedy, (2) James, (3) Robert Raworth, (4) Richard Pearce. The latter is buried in the Kennedy vault in St. Matthew's burial ground, Windsor. The daughters were: (1) Elizabeth Moore, who married George Dight; (2) Frances Jane, who mar- ried James G. Doyle; (3) Catherine Brough-ton, who married Andrew Doyle; (4) Sophia, first wife of Samuel B. Dight; (5) Emma, second wife of Samuel B. Dight.

James Howe, second son of John Howe I., was the only son who married, Anne Dight, a sister of Samuel B. Dight being his bride.

This couple had one son, John Hilton Howe by name, who died at the age of 21 years, and with his death the name Howe as a surname; so far as this notable family is concerned, died out.

After Mrs. Mary Howe-Loder-Dargin-White died, her body was brought by train to Windsor from Singleton and interred in the Loder family vault at St. Matthew's. One can quite understand with what vener-ation this famous old place of worship had for her, for without doubt Mary Howe as a girl was an attendant worshipper there. Old Windsorites will be interested to learn that the balconied house in Thompson Square, just below the Royal Hotel, was conducted as an hotel under the name of 'The Lord Nelson' by James Howe (son of John Howe I.) and his wife. That would be during the mid ''thirties' of last century. In Mr. J. C. L. Fitzpatrick's book, 'The Good Old Days of the Hawkesbury,' he refers to 'The Red Lion' in George-street, Windsor, and Mrs. Thomas Dargin (nee Mrs. Mary Howe Loder)—'and a good old lady she was,' he says. But he wrongly refers to her as the mother of all the Dargins, because Thomas Dargin's mother was the first woman in Windsor with that hon-ored name. 1835-37 is the time spoken of by Mr. Fitzpatrick, who also says: 'Dar-gin's was the scene of many a gay gather-ing, and as he could spin a good yarn, his house was much frequented. Dargin's 'Red Lion' occupied the place where Dyer's shop now stands' (1900).

This sketch of John Howe's descendants is an outline only. Through his daughters (seven in all) by his two marriages, there have descended some notable people who have pioneered pastoral districts in this State—the Loders, the Dights, the Doyles, and the Dargins-people whose life's careers have been meritorious. The pastoralists bearing those names have in every sense been acquisitions to this State in exploring and taking up 'rough country,' and improving' the breeds of sheep and stock generally. Some of their achieve-ments I shall deal with at length in 'Eben-ezer Pioneers of the Hawkesbury,' which is now being gotten into shape.

John Kennedy Howe lived most of his life on 'Redbournebury,' the 700 acres grant given by Governor Macquarie to John Howe I. for his discoveries of the rich country on the Hunter River. During J. K. Howe's occupancy of the Manor House he enter-tained lavishly and on a large scale. At his death the estate, which is part of and adjoining the town of Singleton, was cut up and sold for farms.

J. K. Howe's photo, from which the accompanying1 block was made was taken some few months before his death. He is buried in the Church of England cemetery at Whittingham, near Singleton.

Later, the writer will outline some matters of interest about "John Howe—Pioneer and Patriot, Settler and Explorer."

Publication: Singleton Argus (NSW : 1880 - 1954), Saturday 27 September 1890, page 2
Birth of a son
#3
James HOWE
about 1813 (Age 39)
Citation details: HOWE JAMES 3121/1813 V18133121 1A JOHN JANE
Birth of a daughter
#4
Frances J HOWE
about 1814 (Age 40)
Citation details: HOWE FRANCES J 3385/1814 V18143385 1A JOHN JANE
Birth of a daughter
#5
Emma HOWE
about 1815 (Age 41)
Citation details: HOWE EMMA 3790/1815 V18153790 1B JOHN JANE
Marriage of a childGeorge LODERMary Ann HOWEView this family
Type: Religious marriage
about 1816 (Age 42)
Address: St. Mathew's
Religion: Church of England
Citation details: 1929/1816 V18161929 3A LODER GEORGE HOWE MARY CC
Publication: Part: Windsor and Richmond Gazette (NSW : 1888 - 1954), Friday 11 November 1921, page 11
Birth of a daughter
#6
Catherine Broughton HOWE
April 13, 1817 (Age 43)
Birth of a granddaughter
#1
Mary LODER
about 1817 (Age 43)
Citation details: LODER MARY 4343/1817 V18174343 1B GEORGE MARY
Birth of a daughter
#7
Sophia HOWE
about 1819 (Age 45)
Citation details: HOW SOPHIA 4791/1819 V18194791 1B JOHN JANE
Birth of a grandson
#2
George LODER
about 1819 (Age 45)
Citation details: LODER GEORGE 4860/1819 V18194860 1B GEORGE MARY
Birth of a son
#8
Robert H HOWE
about 1820 (Age 46)
Citation details: HOWE ROBERT H 6551/1820 V18206551 1B JOHN JANE
Occupation
Chief Constable
between 1814 and 1821 (Age 40)
Publication: Web Site
Birth of a granddaughter
#3
Jane LODER
about 1821 (Age 47)
Citation details: LODER JANE 5537/1821 V18215537 1B GEORGE MARY
Birth of a daughter
#9
Elizabeth Moore HOWE
about 1823 (Age 49)
Citation details: HOWE ELIZABETH M 6552/1823 V18236552 1B JOHN JANE
Birth of a grandson
#4
George T LODER
about 1823 (Age 49)
Citation details: LODER GEORGE T 6410/1823 V18236410 1B GEORGE MARY
Birth of a grandson
#5
Andrew LODER
about 1826 (Age 52)
Citation details: LODER ANDREW 7434/1826 V18267434 1C GEORGE MARY
Text:

There is also this reference:

LODER ANDREW 502/1826 V1826502 10 GEORGE MARY

Birth of a son
#10
Richard Pearce HOWE
about 1827 (Age 53)
Citation details: HOWE RICHARD P 757/1827 V1827757 16 JOHN JANE
Occupation
Coroner
between 1821 and 1828 (Age 47)
Publication: Web Site
Birth of a granddaughter
#6
Sarah LODER
about 1828 (Age 54)
Citation details: LODER SARAH 511/1828 V1828511 12 GEORGE MARY
Birth of a grandson
#7
James M LODER
about 1830 (Age 56)
Citation details: LODER JAMES M 9936/1830 V18309936 1C GEORGE MARY
Text:

There is also this reference:

LODER JAMES M 589/1830 V1830589 14 GEORGE MARY

Marriage of a childThomas DARGINMary Ann HOWEView this family
Type: Religious marriage
about 1835 (Age 61)
Address: St. Mathew's
Religion: Church of England
Citation details: 1437/1835 V18351437 19 DARGIN THOMAS LODER MARY CC
Publication: Part: Windsor and Richmond Gazette (NSW : 1888 - 1954), Friday 11 November 1921, page 11
Marriage of a childAndrew DOYLECatherine Broughton HOWEView this family
about 1837 (Age 63)
Citation details: 260/1837 V1837260 162A DOYLE ANDREW HOWE CATHERINE BROUGHTON JS
Birth of a grandson
#8
John W DARGIN
about 1838 (Age 64)
Citation details: DARGIN JOHN W 769/1838 V1838769 22 THOMAS MARY
Birth of a grandson
#9
Andrew Cyrus DOYLE
March 9, 1838 (Age 64)
Citation details: DOYLE ANDREW C 763/1838 V1838763 22 ANDREW CATHERINE
Birth of a grandson
#10
John K DOYLE
about 1840 (Age 66)
Citation details: DOYLE JOHN K 1496/1840 V18401496 24A ANDREW CATHERINE B
Birth of a granddaughter
#11
Jane S DOYLE
about 1841 (Age 67)
Citation details: DOYLE JANE S 1803/1841 V18411803 25A ANDREW CATHERINE
Marriage of a childGeorge DIGHTElizabeth Moore HOWEView this family
about 1841 (Age 67)
Citation details: 549/1841 V1841549 25C DIGHT GEORGE HOWE ELIZABETH M CT
Birth of a grandson
#12
James H DOYLE
about 1844 (Age 70)
Citation details: DOYLE JAMES H 2534/1844 V18442534 28 ANDREW CATHERINE
Birth of a granddaughter
#13
Frances DOYLE
about 1845 (Age 71)
Citation details: DOYLE FRANCES 2661/1845 V18452661 31A ANDREW CATHERINE B
Marriage of a childLaban WHITEMary Ann HOWEView this family
about 1846 (Age 72)
Citation details: 222/1846 V1846222 31C WHITE LABAN DARGIN MARY CC
Birth of a grandson
#14
Robert DOYLE
about 1848 (Age 74)
Citation details: DOYLE ROBERT 2618/1848 V18482618 33A ANDREW CATHERINE B
Birth of a granddaughter
#15
Emma J DOYLE
about 1850 (Age 76)
Citation details: DOYLE EMMA J 2894/1850 V18502894 35 ANDREW CATHERINE
Birth of a granddaughter
#16
Eliza S DOYLE
about 1852 (Age 78)
Citation details: DOYLE ELIZA S 826/1852 V1852826 52 ANDREW CATHERINE B
Death December 19, 1852 (Age 78)
Address: At his residence "Raworth" cottage.
Citation details: HOWE JOHN 1645/1852 V18521645 38B AGE 78
Publication: Newspaper NSW : 1843 - 1893
Citation details: Wednesday 22 December 1852, page 3
Howe - John - Death Notice
Howe - John - Death Notice

Note: Downloaded from Trove.

Biography 1966 (113 years after death)
Publication: Web Site
Text:

Howe, John (1774–1852) by Nancy Gray

This article was published in Australian Dictionary of Biography, Volume 1, (MUP), 1966

John Howe (1774-1852), settler, was born probably at Redbourn, Hertfordshire, England, son of John How and his wife Mary, née Roberts. Soundly educated and, by his own statement, brought up to husbandry, he worked in a grocery business in London while waiting for a passage to New South Wales, where he proposed to become a teacher. With his wife Frances, née Ward, and daughter Mary he arrived in the Coromandel I in June 1802, and received a grant of 100 acres (40 ha) at Mulgrave Place on the Hawkesbury River. Frances died three months later and was buried at Parramatta. Howe married Jane, a daughter of James Raworth Kennedy, at St John's, Parramatta, on 13 May 1811.

Although retaining his grant until 1813 Howe showed little interest in farming. He succeeded Andrew Thompson as licensed auctioneer at Windsor in 1811 and by his successful management of the sales of Thompson's property earned the lasting favour of Governor Lachlan Macquarie. With James McGrath he contracted in 1813 to complete and repair the road from Sydney to Windsor and, for Thompson's executors, to build a toll-bridge, known for many years as Howe's Bridge, over South Creek at Windsor. In 1815 the partners enlarged the Windsor wharf and a year later began another for the government. As chief constable at Windsor from 1814 to 1821 and as coroner during the next seven years Howe's record was one of honest, reliable, if unspectacular, service.

Encouraged by Macquarie, Howe left Windsor on 24 October 1819 with a party of five white men and two Aboriginals, hoping to discover a trafficable route from the Hawkesbury to the Hunter River. Part of the route had been traversed in 1817 by William Parr and in 1818 by Benjamin Singleton, both of whom set out from the Hawkesbury. It was common knowledge that convicts escaping from the Coal River settlement (Newcastle) made their way overland to the Hawkesbury, but no through road had yet been established. Howe succeeded in reaching the Hunter near Doyle's Creek on 5 November 1819, discovering much fine grazing land, but returned dissatisfied with the route. A second expedition, with thirteen white men and two natives under Howe's command, left Windsor late in February 1820 and, following the expert advice of the native guides, Howe mapped a route which is now the Bulga Road. On 15 March he reached the Hunter River near the present site of Whittingham and followed its course as far as Maitland before returning to the Hawkesbury. Macquarie rewarded him with a licence to graze his flocks on the land he had discovered at St Patrick's Plains, and with a grant of 700 acres (283 ha) later named Redbourneberry which Howe selected near the present site of Singleton. An additional 500-acre (202 ha) grant was made in 1824. Howe left Windsor in 1839 and retired to a small farm, Raworth, near Morpeth, where he remained until his death on 19 December 1852. He was buried in St James's churchyard, Morpeth. His wife Jane died at Warkworth on 1 January 1859, aged 75, survived by seven of their nine children.

John Howe's name and that of his first wife, Frances Ward, are inscribed on a tablet, commemorating its founders, in the Presbyterian Church at Ebenezer. Howe's Park in Singleton, once part of the Redbourneberry estate, and Howe's Swamp, Howe's Mountain and Howe's Valley, along the Bulga Road, perpetuate the memory of this worthy man.

Family with Frances WARD - View this family
himself
wife
Woman Pioneer IconFrances WARD
Birth: 1772Hertfordshire, England, United Kingdom
Death: September 1802Parramatta, , New South Wales, Australia
Marriage: before 1802England, United Kingdom
-3 years
daughter
Family with Jane KENNEDY - View this family
himself
wife
Marriage: May 13, 1811Parramatta, , New South Wales, Australia
11 months
son
Howe - John KennedyJohn Kennedy HOWE
Birth: April 5, 1812 38 27Windsor, , New South Wales, Australia
Death: September 24, 1890Singleton, , New South Wales, Australia
21 months
son
2 years
daughter
2 years
daughter
2 years
daughter
3 years
daughter
2 years
son
4 years
daughter
Elizabeth Moore HOWE
Birth: about 1823 49 38New South Wales, Australia
Death: about 1908Burwood, , New South Wales, Australia
5 years
son
+ Jane KENNEDY - View this family
wife’s husband
wife
step-daughter

BirthWeb Site - People Australia
MarriageAustralian Dictionary of Biography - Online Edition
Publication: Web Site
ImmigrationThe Port Jackson Convicts Anthology
Publication: Lesley Uebel, 2001, CD
Citation details: The Transports Page 4
ImmigrationAustralian Dictionary of Biography - Online Edition
Publication: Web Site
Land GrantAustralian Dictionary of Biography - Online Edition
Publication: Web Site
Howe - John - Land Grant
Howe - John - Land Grant

Note: Downloaded from the Australian Dictionary of Biography.

MarriageAustralian Dictionary of Biography - Online Edition
Publication: Web Site
MarriageSt. John's Parramatta, Marriages, 1790-1966
Publication: New South Wales, Australia, St. John's Parramatta, Marriages, 1790-1966
Howe - Kennedy - John and Jane - Marriage Certificate
Howe - Kennedy - John and Jane - Marriage Certificate

Note: Downloaded from ancestry.com.au

OccupationAustralian Dictionary of Biography - Online Edition
Publication: Web Site
OccupationAustralian Dictionary of Biography - Online Edition
Publication: Web Site
DeathWeb Site - People Australia
DeathH - Deaths Registered in New South Wales
Citation details: HOWE JOHN 1645/1852 V18521645 38B AGE 78
DeathNewspaper - The Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser
Publication: Newspaper NSW : 1843 - 1893
Citation details: Wednesday 22 December 1852, page 3
Howe - John - Death Notice
Howe - John - Death Notice

Note: Downloaded from Trove.

BiographyAustralian Dictionary of Biography - Online Edition
Publication: Web Site
Text:

Howe, John (1774–1852) by Nancy Gray

This article was published in Australian Dictionary of Biography, Volume 1, (MUP), 1966

John Howe (1774-1852), settler, was born probably at Redbourn, Hertfordshire, England, son of John How and his wife Mary, née Roberts. Soundly educated and, by his own statement, brought up to husbandry, he worked in a grocery business in London while waiting for a passage to New South Wales, where he proposed to become a teacher. With his wife Frances, née Ward, and daughter Mary he arrived in the Coromandel I in June 1802, and received a grant of 100 acres (40 ha) at Mulgrave Place on the Hawkesbury River. Frances died three months later and was buried at Parramatta. Howe married Jane, a daughter of James Raworth Kennedy, at St John's, Parramatta, on 13 May 1811.

Although retaining his grant until 1813 Howe showed little interest in farming. He succeeded Andrew Thompson as licensed auctioneer at Windsor in 1811 and by his successful management of the sales of Thompson's property earned the lasting favour of Governor Lachlan Macquarie. With James McGrath he contracted in 1813 to complete and repair the road from Sydney to Windsor and, for Thompson's executors, to build a toll-bridge, known for many years as Howe's Bridge, over South Creek at Windsor. In 1815 the partners enlarged the Windsor wharf and a year later began another for the government. As chief constable at Windsor from 1814 to 1821 and as coroner during the next seven years Howe's record was one of honest, reliable, if unspectacular, service.

Encouraged by Macquarie, Howe left Windsor on 24 October 1819 with a party of five white men and two Aboriginals, hoping to discover a trafficable route from the Hawkesbury to the Hunter River. Part of the route had been traversed in 1817 by William Parr and in 1818 by Benjamin Singleton, both of whom set out from the Hawkesbury. It was common knowledge that convicts escaping from the Coal River settlement (Newcastle) made their way overland to the Hawkesbury, but no through road had yet been established. Howe succeeded in reaching the Hunter near Doyle's Creek on 5 November 1819, discovering much fine grazing land, but returned dissatisfied with the route. A second expedition, with thirteen white men and two natives under Howe's command, left Windsor late in February 1820 and, following the expert advice of the native guides, Howe mapped a route which is now the Bulga Road. On 15 March he reached the Hunter River near the present site of Whittingham and followed its course as far as Maitland before returning to the Hawkesbury. Macquarie rewarded him with a licence to graze his flocks on the land he had discovered at St Patrick's Plains, and with a grant of 700 acres (283 ha) later named Redbourneberry which Howe selected near the present site of Singleton. An additional 500-acre (202 ha) grant was made in 1824. Howe left Windsor in 1839 and retired to a small farm, Raworth, near Morpeth, where he remained until his death on 19 December 1852. He was buried in St James's churchyard, Morpeth. His wife Jane died at Warkworth on 1 January 1859, aged 75, survived by seven of their nine children.

John Howe's name and that of his first wife, Frances Ward, are inscribed on a tablet, commemorating its founders, in the Presbyterian Church at Ebenezer. Howe's Park in Singleton, once part of the Redbourneberry estate, and Howe's Swamp, Howe's Mountain and Howe's Valley, along the Bulga Road, perpetuate the memory of this worthy man.