Mid North Coast Pioneers - Newcastle to Lismore and beyond

Bowen - Sir Nigel Hubert

Sir Nigel Hubert BOWEN AC, KBE, QCAge: 83 years19111994

Name
Sir Nigel Hubert BOWEN AC, KBE, QC
Name prefix
Sir
Given names
Nigel Hubert
Surname
BOWEN
Name suffix
AC, KBE, QC
Birth May 26, 1911
Publication: Narrawallee, NSW, Australia; Phil and Jan Gregory; Mar 2007; ISBN 978-0-9750011-2-7
Citation details: Descendants of Elizabeth Gregory Page 8
Quality of data: secondary evidence
Source: Wikipedia
Publication: Internet site
Note: Born in a log cabin.
Education
High School
before 1930 (Age 18 years)
Address: The Kings School George Street
School or college: The Kings School
Source: Wikipedia
Publication: Internet site
Education
University
after 1930 (Age 18 years)
School or college: University of New South Wales
Occupation
Solicitor
1936 (Age 24 years)
Publication: 1936
Residence 1936 (Age 24 years)
Address: "Barton" Warrawee Avenue Turramurra NSW
Publication: 1936
Military
Volunteered
1941 (Age 29 years)
Agency: Australian Military Force
Military
transferred
1942 (Age 30 years)
Agency: Australian Infantry Force
Note: With the advent of World War II, he enlisted in the Australian military forces in 1941 before transferring to the 2nd AIF in 1942. He served in the South Pacific region for two years, then transferred to the reserves in 1946 with the rank of captain.
Occupation
Barrister
1953 (Age 41 years)
Source: Wikipedia
Publication: Internet site
Death of a fatherOtway Percival BOWEN
about 1955 (Age 43 years)
Publication: New South Wales Government
Citation details: 1999/1955 BOWEN OTWAY PERCIVAL PERCIVAL MARY ELIZABETH HORNSBY
Occupation
Member of Parliament
1964 (Age 52 years)
Employer: Australian Government
Source: Wikipedia
Publication: Internet site
Occupation
Attorney General
December 1966 (Age 55 years)
Employer: Australian Government
Source: Wikipedia
Publication: Internet site
Occupation
Minister for Education and Science
November 1969 (Age 58 years)
Employer: Australian Government
Source: Wikipedia
Publication: Internet site
Occupation
Attorney General
between March 1971 and August 1971 (Age 59 years)
Employer: Australian Government
Source: Wikipedia
Publication: Internet site
Occupation
Minister for Foreign Affairs
between September 1971 and 1972 (Age 60 years)
Employer: Australian Government
Source: Wikipedia
Publication: Internet site
Death of a motherDorothy Joan
about 1973 (Age 61 years)
Publication: New South Wales Government
Citation details: 49909/1973 BOWEN DOROTHY JOAN ALBERT KING CHARLOTTE ST LEONARDS
Occupation
Chief Judge in Equity
1973 (Age 61 years)
Employer: Supreme Court of New South Wales
Source: Wikipedia
Publication: Internet site
Honours
Knight Commander of the British Empire
1976 (Age 64 years)
Source: Wikipedia
Publication: Internet site
Note: Made a Knight Commander of the British Empire.
MarriageLady Ermyn Winifred HOOKWAY BSc, DipEdView this family
June 9, 1984 (Age 73 years)
Publication: Narrawallee, NSW, Australia; Phil and Jan Gregory; Mar 2007; ISBN 978-0-9750011-2-7
Citation details: Descendants of Elizabeth Gregory Page 8
Quality of data: secondary evidence
Occupation
first Chief Justice of the Federal Court of Australia
between 1976 and 1990 (Age 64 years)
Employer: Federal Court of Australia
Source: Wikipedia
Publication: Internet site
Honours
Companion of the Order of Australia
1988 (Age 76 years)
Source: Wikipedia
Publication: Internet site
Death September 27, 1994 (Age 83 years)
Source: Wikipedia
Publication: Internet site
Obituary October 10, 1994 (13 days after death)
Address: Parliament House Canberra ACT
Note: Hansard of Australian House of Representatives of 10 October 1994:
Obituary October 10, 1994 (13 days after death)
Address: Parliament House Canberra ACT
Text:

Hansard of the House of Representatives of the Australian Commonwealth Government of 10 October 1994.

"Mr RUDDOCK (Berowra) —May I first thank the Speaker for giving me the opportunity to represent this House at the state funeral for Sir Nigel Bowen on Saturday. I was certainly most distressed to learn of his death. Sir Nigel lived a good many years. He made an enormous contribution in so many fields of endeavour and it is a wrench when somebody like him is taken, even at this time. I join in speaking to the condolence motion to ensure that Lady Ermyn Bowen and Sir Nigel's daughters are aware of the way we feel about him and about his passing.

I succeeded Sir Nigel as the member for Parramatta. I did not serve in the parliament with him. He left here in 1973, and in September of that year I was elected to succeed him. He had been a very fine representative in the parliament. I had been President of the Young Liberals and worked with him in that capacity over some years. I was very much aware of his contribution in Parramatta because I had been associated with the area for most of my life. As has been mentioned, between 1964 and 1973, whilst he was in the parliament, he had the privilege to serve as our foreign minister, Attorney-General and Minister for Education and Science. As has been remarked by the Attorney-General (Mr Lavarch), he missed by only one vote as being chosen as Leader of the Opposition in 1972. In relation to that, I guess a number of stories could be told.

Sir Nigel's contribution to the Liberal Party was most significant. He brought stability and good sense to decision making. He was seen as having been a most significant contributor to policy development at a time the Liberal Party, having been in office for some 23 years, was seen as being vulnerable. More importantly, he was a popular local member of parliament, as I discovered only too quickly—I was often compared to him.

Sir Nigel's secretary was with me for a number of years. She was a very fine lady who always told me that, when Nigel was holding clinic—if one may use that term—in his Parramatta office, he would make sure that he walked the streets for some 15 to 30 minutes just to be seen about. I think all of that showed. He had that great eminence as a national leader, but his assiduous attention to the needs of his constituents, in my view, ensured that he held the seat of Parramatta when most other people thought it would have been lost. If my memory is correct, I think he won at that time by something of the order of 356 votes, which ensured that Michael Whealan did not have a career in this parliament.

I was interested in the Attorney-General's remarks because he drew very heavily upon the speech of a former member of this parliament—Bob Ellicott, formerly the member for Wentworth—at the state funeral. Bob's eulogy made a number of important points. Those first points about Nigel having being born in Canada and his family's early difficulties—the log cabin, the cherry orchard, the resumption by the railway, the move to Australia, the history of drought in Gunnedah, which I suspect is in the electorate of the right honourable member for New England (Mr Sinclair)—

Mr Sinclair —No. Actually the electorate of the honourable member for Gwydir.

Mr RUDDOCK —But close by. One of the things that people often thought about Nigel Bowen was that because he went to the King's School in Parramatta he was a person who would not understand what hardship and adversity meant and that because of his association with the King's School in Parramatta he should be held out to be some rather ephemeral character with little regard for the wishes and aspirations of ordinary people.

Nigel Bowen was brought up in Ashfield. He was sent to the King's School because of the generosity of a paternal aunt, the same aunt who gave him a short period of education in the United Kingdom. He went to Sydney University on a Commonwealth scholarship and, on what I know from my own father's experience, a university exhibition, which was available to those who were in effect pledging their future in order to obtain an education. He also won an exhibition to St Paul's College, where he also had a very notable career as a general all-rounder, something that I think distinguished Sir Nigel through the whole of his career.

I wanted to make those points about Sir Nigel's early life because they link very well with some comments that Bob Ellicott had to make about Sir Nigel the politician. Because they were made by Bob Ellicott—a person whom I greatly admire, a person of great eminence himself—I think they mean so much more. I encourage those who want to know a bit more about Bob Ellicott to read his maiden speech in this parliament because it was another matter that distinguished him from many who come to this place. He had this to say of Nigel Bowen:

At the outset it is important to understand the breadth of his political outlook. He was not a conservative. He had passionate concern for the country as a whole. He placed the interests of Australia first and above sectional attitudes and loyalties. He was a liberal thinker. But to him liberalism was a way of life not some cold principle of logic. He had a deep concern for the people and their welfare, for the rights of women and the individual's rights in the face of government. His political life bears testimony to all these things.

Nigel Bowen was a man who had achieved great eminence through his own efforts. When somebody like Bob Ellicott says, as he did, of Nigel Bowen that he regarded him as a leading silk at the New South Wales bar, as one of the leaders of the Australian bar and as an acknowledged expert in the fields of constitutional law, commercial law, industrial law, property law, company law, tax law, probate law as the breadth of his advisory practice, and that his opinion and advocacy were widely respected and sought, it means something. He added:

He appeared often and in a variety of cases both in trial and appellate courts. As the years passed his reputation as an appellate advocate grew as a study of Commonwealth law reports will quickly reveal. He appeared on a number of occasions in the Privy Council. I was able, while waiting for a case there to compare him with one of England's leading counsel. Nigel did not suffer from the comparison.

What distinguishes this man is that, notwithstanding that eminence, he saw fit to contest a seat for this parliament which was not a sinecure; it was always a seat that involved contest, as it does today. He gave up that career to come to this parliament. There are not many today, although there are some—and I look at some of my colleagues as I say this—who give up as much to come and serve in the parliament in the nation's interests. He did serve Australia in that way. I found him a very great and personal example, one that I was proud to follow into this parliament. I do share the particular distress of his family at his passing at this time."

Family with parents - View this family
father
mother
himself
brother
Private
Family with Private - View this family
himself
wife
Private
Family with Lady Ermyn Winifred HOOKWAY BSc, DipEd - View this family
himself
wife
Marriage: June 9, 1984Wahroonga, , New South Wales, Australia
Rudolph William Cecil “Bill” KRIPPNER + Lady Ermyn Winifred HOOKWAY BSc, DipEd - View this family
wife’s husband
Rudolph William Cecil “Bill” KRIPPNER
Birth: January 20, 1910 44 40Wollongong, , New South Wales, Australia
Death: November 24, 1975Haberfield, , New South Wales, Australia
wife
Marriage: January 8, 1949Ashfield, , New South Wales, Australia

BirthThe Newcastle Connection: A Gregory Family History
Publication: Narrawallee, NSW, Australia; Phil and Jan Gregory; Mar 2007; ISBN 978-0-9750011-2-7
Citation details: Descendants of Elizabeth Gregory Page 8
Quality of data: secondary evidence
BirthGedcom 24 August, 2006 Jan Gregory
BirthWikipedia
Publication: Internet site
EducationWikipedia
Publication: Internet site
EducationHansard - Parliament of Australia
EducationHansard - Parliament of Australia
OccupationAustralian Electoral Roll - NSW - 1936
Publication: 1936
ResidenceAustralian Electoral Roll - NSW - 1936
Publication: 1936
MilitaryHansard - Parliament of Australia
MilitaryHansard - Parliament of Australia
OccupationWikipedia
Publication: Internet site
OccupationHansard - Parliament of Australia
OccupationWikipedia
Publication: Internet site
OccupationHansard - Parliament of Australia
OccupationWikipedia
Publication: Internet site
OccupationHansard - Parliament of Australia
OccupationWikipedia
Publication: Internet site
OccupationHansard - Parliament of Australia
OccupationWikipedia
Publication: Internet site
OccupationHansard - Parliament of Australia
OccupationWikipedia
Publication: Internet site
OccupationHansard - Parliament of Australia
OccupationWikipedia
Publication: Internet site
OccupationHansard - Parliament of Australia
OccupationWikipedia
Publication: Internet site
OccupationHansard - Parliament of Australia
HonoursWikipedia
Publication: Internet site
MarriageThe Newcastle Connection: A Gregory Family History
Publication: Narrawallee, NSW, Australia; Phil and Jan Gregory; Mar 2007; ISBN 978-0-9750011-2-7
Citation details: Descendants of Elizabeth Gregory Page 8
Quality of data: secondary evidence
HonoursWikipedia
Publication: Internet site
NameGedcom 24 August, 2006 Jan Gregory
DeathGedcom 24 August, 2006 Jan Gregory
DeathWikipedia
Publication: Internet site
DeathHansard - Parliament of Australia
ObituaryHansard - Parliament of Australia
ObituaryHansard - Parliament of Australia
Text:

Hansard of the House of Representatives of the Australian Commonwealth Government of 10 October 1994.

"Mr RUDDOCK (Berowra) —May I first thank the Speaker for giving me the opportunity to represent this House at the state funeral for Sir Nigel Bowen on Saturday. I was certainly most distressed to learn of his death. Sir Nigel lived a good many years. He made an enormous contribution in so many fields of endeavour and it is a wrench when somebody like him is taken, even at this time. I join in speaking to the condolence motion to ensure that Lady Ermyn Bowen and Sir Nigel's daughters are aware of the way we feel about him and about his passing.

I succeeded Sir Nigel as the member for Parramatta. I did not serve in the parliament with him. He left here in 1973, and in September of that year I was elected to succeed him. He had been a very fine representative in the parliament. I had been President of the Young Liberals and worked with him in that capacity over some years. I was very much aware of his contribution in Parramatta because I had been associated with the area for most of my life. As has been mentioned, between 1964 and 1973, whilst he was in the parliament, he had the privilege to serve as our foreign minister, Attorney-General and Minister for Education and Science. As has been remarked by the Attorney-General (Mr Lavarch), he missed by only one vote as being chosen as Leader of the Opposition in 1972. In relation to that, I guess a number of stories could be told.

Sir Nigel's contribution to the Liberal Party was most significant. He brought stability and good sense to decision making. He was seen as having been a most significant contributor to policy development at a time the Liberal Party, having been in office for some 23 years, was seen as being vulnerable. More importantly, he was a popular local member of parliament, as I discovered only too quickly—I was often compared to him.

Sir Nigel's secretary was with me for a number of years. She was a very fine lady who always told me that, when Nigel was holding clinic—if one may use that term—in his Parramatta office, he would make sure that he walked the streets for some 15 to 30 minutes just to be seen about. I think all of that showed. He had that great eminence as a national leader, but his assiduous attention to the needs of his constituents, in my view, ensured that he held the seat of Parramatta when most other people thought it would have been lost. If my memory is correct, I think he won at that time by something of the order of 356 votes, which ensured that Michael Whealan did not have a career in this parliament.

I was interested in the Attorney-General's remarks because he drew very heavily upon the speech of a former member of this parliament—Bob Ellicott, formerly the member for Wentworth—at the state funeral. Bob's eulogy made a number of important points. Those first points about Nigel having being born in Canada and his family's early difficulties—the log cabin, the cherry orchard, the resumption by the railway, the move to Australia, the history of drought in Gunnedah, which I suspect is in the electorate of the right honourable member for New England (Mr Sinclair)—

Mr Sinclair —No. Actually the electorate of the honourable member for Gwydir.

Mr RUDDOCK —But close by. One of the things that people often thought about Nigel Bowen was that because he went to the King's School in Parramatta he was a person who would not understand what hardship and adversity meant and that because of his association with the King's School in Parramatta he should be held out to be some rather ephemeral character with little regard for the wishes and aspirations of ordinary people.

Nigel Bowen was brought up in Ashfield. He was sent to the King's School because of the generosity of a paternal aunt, the same aunt who gave him a short period of education in the United Kingdom. He went to Sydney University on a Commonwealth scholarship and, on what I know from my own father's experience, a university exhibition, which was available to those who were in effect pledging their future in order to obtain an education. He also won an exhibition to St Paul's College, where he also had a very notable career as a general all-rounder, something that I think distinguished Sir Nigel through the whole of his career.

I wanted to make those points about Sir Nigel's early life because they link very well with some comments that Bob Ellicott had to make about Sir Nigel the politician. Because they were made by Bob Ellicott—a person whom I greatly admire, a person of great eminence himself—I think they mean so much more. I encourage those who want to know a bit more about Bob Ellicott to read his maiden speech in this parliament because it was another matter that distinguished him from many who come to this place. He had this to say of Nigel Bowen:

At the outset it is important to understand the breadth of his political outlook. He was not a conservative. He had passionate concern for the country as a whole. He placed the interests of Australia first and above sectional attitudes and loyalties. He was a liberal thinker. But to him liberalism was a way of life not some cold principle of logic. He had a deep concern for the people and their welfare, for the rights of women and the individual's rights in the face of government. His political life bears testimony to all these things.

Nigel Bowen was a man who had achieved great eminence through his own efforts. When somebody like Bob Ellicott says, as he did, of Nigel Bowen that he regarded him as a leading silk at the New South Wales bar, as one of the leaders of the Australian bar and as an acknowledged expert in the fields of constitutional law, commercial law, industrial law, property law, company law, tax law, probate law as the breadth of his advisory practice, and that his opinion and advocacy were widely respected and sought, it means something. He added:

He appeared often and in a variety of cases both in trial and appellate courts. As the years passed his reputation as an appellate advocate grew as a study of Commonwealth law reports will quickly reveal. He appeared on a number of occasions in the Privy Council. I was able, while waiting for a case there to compare him with one of England's leading counsel. Nigel did not suffer from the comparison.

What distinguishes this man is that, notwithstanding that eminence, he saw fit to contest a seat for this parliament which was not a sinecure; it was always a seat that involved contest, as it does today. He gave up that career to come to this parliament. There are not many today, although there are some—and I look at some of my colleagues as I say this—who give up as much to come and serve in the parliament in the nation's interests. He did serve Australia in that way. I found him a very great and personal example, one that I was proud to follow into this parliament. I do share the particular distress of his family at his passing at this time."

NoteWikipedia
Publication: Internet site