Mid North Coast Pioneers - Newcastle to Lismore and beyond

William GREGORY + Sarah NICHOLSON

6 children

Parents Grandparents

Family group information
Religious marriage August 20, 1838
Address: St. Philip's Cnr York, Jamison and Clarence Streets
Citation details: 1601 Vol:22
Gregory-Nicholson
Gregory-Nicholson

Note: This is a transcription of the church parish register.

Citation details: 1601/1838 V18381601 22 GREGORY WILLIAM NICHOLSON SARAH CA
Note: Witnesses to the marriage were Alex and Ann Anderson.
Residence September 24, 1839
Address: Fort Street
Publication: Issued in Sydney on 6 Feb 2003
Note: At the time of the birth of their son William.
Residence December 24, 1859
Address: Lake McQuarie Road
Text:

At the time of the birth of her son Joseph

Community Involvement
Citation details: Email sent 30 March, 2006
Text:

To: Stuart Gregory From: Jan Gregory Subject: Fwd: Birth Dates Date: Thu, 30 Mar 2006 23:23:24 +1000

Here are the birth dates I have on file. The Gregory family attended "Church of St John the Evangelist" C of E, Cooks Hill, Newcastle, Newcastle City Library has the church records on microfilm for Marriages and Birth, they are scanned copies of the original registers so are in date order. Some time towards 1890 the family changed to "St Augustine's" C of E at Merewether, only the marriage records are available for this Church.

In the Federal Directory of Newcastle & District 1901 page 180/181 Religions. William Gregory was a Lay Representative for the Parish of Merewether in the 3 session of the Twelfth synod of the Diocese of Newcastle held at Newcastle in May, 1900. - (You might already have this information). I've asked Maree if there's anything to confirm it was "our William" (1839 - 1931)

GREGORY Aimee Aggett b 3.5.1885 Junction Alan Nicholson b 14.6.1884 - Junction Alice b. 3.5.1880 Arthur James b. 12.2.1882 Arthur William Walter b. 8.7.1877 Junction d. 1877 Ella b.13.10.1866 Burwood, Eva Mary b. 22.6.1888 - Glebeland Eva May b. 13.6.1880 - Junction Fred Nicholson b 7.12.1883 Burwood George Christopher b 22.7.1865 Burwood, d. 1865 Newcastle George Charles b.19.1.1869 Burwood Harry Nicholson b. 10.2.1874 Herbert John James b 28.12.1870 c.26.3.1871 (not on Sandgate records) Interstate?? This is one for whom I have found nothing else. To WA looking for gold??? Boer War?? I have no other clues. The death cert of John George should list all chn still living. Joseph James b 4.1.1875 Minnie Nicholson b. 26.8.1881 Burwood Richard James b 3.7.1868 - Newcastle

Agnes HOOKWAY b 15.5.1878 Burwood Ann Nicholson HOOKWAY b 5.12.1868 Newcastle Eleanor Bertha HOOKWAY b. 7.5.1875 Darby St, Newcastle

Ethel HOOKWAY b. 9.2.1871 Newcastle William John HOOKWAY b. 17.12.1872 Newcastle d. 1875 Lucy HOOKWAY b. 8.2.1880 Burwood OWEN, Edwin Richard b.3.5.1894 Hunter Street, Cooks Hill Ivan J Owen - This is the spelling on Sandgate Records. Buried 30 Oct 1896

Mary HUDSON - On St John Marriage Register -born at Parramatta Father - Thomas Hudson - Sail Maker, Mother - Sarah Lambert. James Gregory occupation - Miner - I hope this helps as I only have access up to Reel 123 at my local libraries.

ELSIE SHARPE d. 17.5.1961 in Qld (Place not on record) F-James Gregory, M - Hudson.

It's great to have all these birth dates. More gaps filled! Best wishes, Jan

Quality of data: secondary evidence
Note: The Gregory family attended "Church of St John the Evangelist" C of E, Cooks Hill, Newcastle. Newcastle City Library has the church records on microfilm for Marriages and Birth, they are scanned copies of the original registers so are in date order. Some time towards 1890 the family changed to "St Augustine's" C of E at Merewether, only the marriage records are available for this church.
Note

In The Newcastle Connection: A Gregory Family History, Phil and Jan wrote a concluding chapter that is transcribed below:

"An Australian Family

When William Gregory and Sarah Nicholson married in Sydney in 1838, the colony of New South Wales had been established for only fifty years. It was a time when the debate was raging over the future of transportation and an end to the convict system. Whether or not William Gregory was a part of that system is an unresolved question. It was a time when inland areas were being opened to pastoral activities in the wake of journeys of exploration. It was also a time of rapid commercial growth asthe colony found a lucartive market for its wool in the rapidly expanding British textile industries. There were plenty of opportunities for skilled tradesmen such as William Gregory.

The move to Morpeth about 1840, saw William and Sarah in a "frontier town". Morpeth was the inland port for the pastoral and commercial development of the Hunter Valley and the Liverpool Plains. Exactly when, and under what circumstances, the family moved to Newcastle is not clear, but it was by Nov 1859. However, The Junction, to which they moved, was an industrial frontier. It was not part of a city with urban amenities, but a scatter of villages adjacent to the various coal pits in a scrubby and boggy stretch of country south of the Hunter River. Some of the family worked in the mines, suffering hard times, industrial conflicts and being touched by tragic accidents. Others worked in building construction which saw the scattered mining villages grow into the suburb of Merewether. But a collection of houses is not a community. Family members became significant members of local churches, particularly the Anglican and Methodist churches in the area, joined masonic lodges and unions, stood for election to council, and were enthusiastic participants in sporting clubs.

World War I prompted family members to volunteer. While none of those who went to France were killed, they were all damaged by the experience. World War II saw a larger number of family members mobilised in the defence of Australia, serving the theMiddle East, Malaya, New Guinea and Borneo as well as in home defence. Ironically, the only person killed by enemy action was one who had been removed from the Army to work in a protected occupation.

Civil societies are not created by market forces or great leaders. They are created by people who produce families, who contribute to the economic life of the country, regardless of occupational status, who devote themselves to essential communityservices such as health and education, who contribute to creating a sense of community through participation in voluntary associations, charities, unions, sporting clubs, cultural societies and churches, and who are prepared to defend their countyin the time of war.

In all these ways, descendants of William and Sarah Gregory have contributed to the creation of an Australian society.

On her arrival in 1837, Sarah Nicholson was noted as being "likely to be useful" to the colony. Indeed she was."